Larrabee State Park w/ Girls Explorers Club

Washington State Parks

8:30AM - 3:30PM
Sun, Feb 03, 2013

CLICK HERE TO JOIN THIS WORK PARTY

photo within Larrabee State Park by Slugman

Northwest WA near Bellingham. WTA will spend a couple of weekends this winter improving several trails within Larrabee State Park. The work will focus on general maintenance including improving drainage in places where the tread is muddy, as well as possible trail realignment.

You will be given a voucher on this work party as part of the Discovery Pass volunteer program. Volunteers can earn an annual Discover Pass after completing 24 hours of service (typically 4 days) on qualifying projects. To learn how you can exchange your vouchers for an annual pass (as well as exclusions), visit the Discover Pass website at http://discoverpass.wa.gov/

Larrabee State Park is a 2,683-acre camping park with 8,100 feet of saltwater shoreline on Samish Bay near Bellingham in northwest Washington. The park features two freshwater lakes, coves and tidelands. Sunsets are gorgeous. A variety of non-motorized, multiple-use trails wind through the park. Joan Burton describes the Fragrance Lake Trail as a "beautiful 2-mile trail through low-elevation old-growth cedars and firs leads upward to a serene woodland lake. Fragrance Lake is crescent-shaped, has trout and skipping water bugs, and can be circled on a level shoreline trail." (From the guidebook "Best Hikes with Kids: Western Washington & the Cascades" - Mountaineers Books)

Driving directions:
From I-5 soutbound: Take exit #250, and turn right onto Fairhaven Pkwy. Go to second stoplight. Turn left on SR 11/Chuckanut Dr. Stay left at next stoplight, and drive six miles to park entrance. From I-5 northbound: Take exit #231. Turn right onto SR 11/Chuckanut Dr., and drive north 14 miles to park entrance. We'll meet by the Clayton Beach parking area by the new Park office. It's about 1/4 of a mile south of the main entrance.

CLICK HERE TO JOIN THIS WORK PARTY

GPS coordinates are only approximate, please always use the written driving directions when trying to find a trail head


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